Open Position at the Schatz Center: Research Assistant or Engineering Technician

We are currently seeking one or more Research Assistants or Engineering Technicians to work at the Schatz Center in Arcata, California. Based on background skillsets, project needs, and interests, the selected applicant(s) will work in one or more of the following active research areas:

  • Offshore Wind Power: Examine the socioeconomic and policy dimensions of offshore wind power in Northern California by conducting stakeholder outreach and evaluating policies at the local, state, and federal levels.
  • Off-Grid Solar for Rural Electrification – Product Performance Testing: Conduct laboratory and desk-based research, data analysis, and report writing/review to support deployment and quality assurance of off-grid solar electricity and/or solar water pumping systems in Africa and/or South Asia.
  • Off-Grid Solar for Rural Electrification – Analysis of Solar Product Users, Technology, & Impacts: Perform analysis of several nationally representative household energy surveys to characterize solar product users. Model environmental and welfare benefits/impacts of energy transitions. Develop and apply tools and approaches to assess the market-readiness of off-grid solar products.
  • Bioenergy: Analyze the performance of biomass conversion systems with physical testing and data analysis. Assess the quality of biomass and biochar products by conducting laboratory tests and physical assessments. Evaluate the market for biochar by designing and conducting interviews with biochar producers and consumers.
  • Renewable Energy Microgrids: Assist with microgrid and EV charging station design, permitting and regulatory processes. Assist with CAD drawing. Assist with evaluation of system benefits and business model. Construction observation.
  • Clean Transportation: Data processing and analysis of electric vehicle load projections. Perform optimization modeling to develop vehicle charging infrastructure. Review and apply equipment specifications. Contribute to translating analysis results to real world scenarios.

Application Deadline: All application materials must be received by 4 pm Pacific Time (US), Wednesday, December 19, 2018. A six-month commitment is required. Reappointment is desirable but contingent on funding, workload requirements, and performance.

Two technicians work with a solar module

Schatz engineering technicians measure the IV curve of a PV module

Schatz Energy Fall 2018 Newsletter

Page 1 of the Schatz Energy news

Our twice-annual print newsletter is now available to download. Features include:

  • The Schatz Center roof goes solar
  • A message from the Director
  • Project announcements and updates
  • Student research 2018
  • Lighting Global Quality Assurance updates
  • Northern CA coast offshore wind feasibility

Download the Fall 2018 Schatz Energy Newsletter

Open Position at the Schatz Center: Student Research Assistant

We are seeking a Student Research Assistant (SRA) to work on the development of an electric bus charging infrastructure optimization model. This work will involve programming in the R language, data processing and analysis, and basic GIS work.

The anticipated start date is on or near January 16, 2019. A one-year commitment is requested. This position is part-time, with an expected time base of 10 hours per week during the academic year and 20 hours per week during the summer. This is a temporary, non-benefited, non-exempt (hourly), non-state position. Compensation will be $11.28-$17.82 per hour, depending on skills and experience.

Application Deadline: All application materials must be received by 4 pm Pacific Time (US), Monday, December 17, 2018.

Students on the lawn of the Schatz Center

Student fellows, docents, and assistants at the Schatz Energy Research Center

Fuel Cell Vehicle Readiness: Project Update

Over the last three years, the Schatz Center has been a technical lead for the North Coast and Upstate Fuel Cell Vehicle Readiness Project, in partnership with the Redwood Coast Energy Authority and six local government agencies across eight counties in Northern California. Funded by the California Energy Commission (PON-14-607), this project seeks to support the successful introduction of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs), reduce barriers to the effective deployment of hydrogen fueling infrastructure, and help catalyze a robust regional market for FCEVs. This project is catalyzed by aggressive California targets to transition the on-road vehicle fleet to zero emission vehicles (ZEVs).

Map of Redding area with priority fueling zones

Map of recommended early market hydrogen fueling zones for the City of Redding, from the Micrositing Summary Report (Image courtesy of Redwood Coast Energy Authority)

This year, the Center has led the completion of two key project deliverables. The first is a Site Readiness Report that provides recommendations for public fueling infrastructure, focusing on the cities of Eureka and Redding. Led by Greg Chapman P.E. with support from Jerome Carman, this report provides an overview of:

  • state of the art of hydrogen fueling station design,
  • current code and safety requirements,
  • station design recommendations, and
  • a list of recommended locations for the installation of hydrogen fueling infrastructure.

The second is a Micrositing Summary Report which documents past efforts and recommends next steps regarding potential station development locations and stakeholder engagement. Going forward, this report will be used to continue engagement with key stakeholders and catalyze momentum towards the development of fueling stations in the North State.

Currently the project team is engaging with state government fleet managers to leverage aggressive mandates (DGS Memo 16-07, SAM 4121, SAM 4126, EO-18-12) as a way to catalyze FCEV adoption in rural areas.

RELATED EVENTS…

On Thursday, October 11, the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series will host a panel discussion on zero-emission vehicles. For this special event, we’re bringing together experts in local planning, state regulation, mass transit, and advanced fuel infrastructure development, to share strategies for achieving a ZEV rollout on the north coast. The talk will be held from 5:30-7 pm on the HSU campus, in Siemens Hall 108.

Achieving 5 million zero-emission vehicles in California by 2030: the local perspective

On October 11, the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series will host a panel discussion on zero-emission vehicles. For this special event, we’re bringing together experts in local planning, state regulation, mass transit, and advanced fuel infrastructure development, to share strategies for achieving a ZEV rollout on the north coast.

Panelists include:
Closeup photo of a charging car

Download the event flyer

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at Humboldt State creates interdisciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. Fall 2018 lectures are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7 pm in HSU Siemens Hall 108. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, visit our series events page or call (707) 826-4345.

Electrifying transportation at HSU

Two cars, with the fuel lines crossing over each other, charge beneath redwoods

HSU’s first electric vehicle station has already provided 60 “charge ups” in the month since fall semester began. Vehicles charged for an average of 2 hours, obtaining an average of 8 kWh of energy, up to a maximum of 31 kWh — and there were 16 times where the primary EV and the ADA parking spot were charging simultaneously.

Since the EV station was installed in early May, it has provided 126 charge ups, that powered 3,600 miles of travel, and avoided the combustion of 117 gallons of gasoline and the emission of 800 kg of CO2e.*

On October 11 at 5:30 pm in Siemens Hall 108, the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series will host a panel discussion on “Achieving 5 million zero-emission vehicles in California by 2030.” Experts from local planning, state regulation, mass transit, and advanced fuel infrastructure development will share strategies for achieving a zero-emission vehicle rollout on the north coast.

A plot shows each charging event at the station, with three slopes -- initial at .5 charges per day, summer at .9 charges per day, and current at 2.3 charging events per day.

This plot shows the increasing use of the station since installation – from less than one charge per day in May, to more than two charges per day since fall semester began. Vehicles may charge for up to four hours at a time. – Graph by Charles Chamberlin, derived from live station data

HSU’s EV charging station is located to the south of the Schatz Energy Research Center (across from the BSS building on the south side of campus). This station can provide charging for either of two adjacent parking spaces. One parking space is EV-only; parking here is limited to four hours, and the vehicle must be charging while parked. The second space is ADA parking (EV not required). HSU parking permits are required for both spaces.

*We assume a vehicle efficiency of 0.325 kWh/mi for EVs, and 31 mpg for gasoline vehicles. Carbon emissions are calculated using the gasoline carbon intensity of 8,815 g CO2e/gallon from EPA emission estimates, and HSU’s 2016 electricity carbon intensity of 192 g CO2e/kWh. (The electricity carbon intensity is the emissions rate associated with the power currently being purchased or generated by a particular source.)

New publication on CA’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard

Kevin Fingerman, Colin Sheppard, and Andrew Harris recently authored an article on California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard: Modeling financial least-cost pathways to compliance in Northern California. This paper shares the results of a technoeconomic model developed at the Schatz Center to explore cost-effective pathways for replacing gasoline with alternative vehicle fuels, such as electricity, biodiesel, ethanol, and hydrogen.

Our study focused on six regions within Northern California, with the goal of simulating the most effective pathway to reaching the 10% reduction in transportation fuel greenhouse gas emissions that is mandated by California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS). Within the study regions, the analysis found that compliance with the LCFS will be more difficult than expected, and that electric vehicles should be expected to play a critical role in achieving vehicle emissions reduction goals.

The article will be published in the August 2018 (Vol 63) edition of Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment and is available to download here in pdf.

Schatz Energy Spring/Summer Newsletter

Our print (and pdf) newsletter is just off the press, with features & updates on:

  • the Redwood Coast Airport (ACV) microgrid
  • breaking ground on Solar+ at the Blue Lake Rancheria
  • the California Biopower Impact project
  • our recent publications on biomass conversion technologies
  • the May dedication of the West Wing addition, and
  • HSU’s first EV charging station, unveiled at the Schatz Center…

… Plus a recap of our spring education and outreach programs, faculty and fellowship news, and recent conference presentations.

Two middle school students hold solar modules and fans in the sun


Students explore solar circuits at the 2018 Redwood Environmental Education Fair

EV charging station unveiled at the Schatz Center

Humboldt State University recently unveiled its first electric vehicle (EV) charging station, located next to the Schatz Center’s “West Wing” addition. “We are proud to introduce electric vehicle charging to the HSU campus and advance our goals of greenhouse gas reduction and sustainability,” says Dr. Peter Lehman, the Center’s founding director. The new charging station supports goals articulated in HSU’s Climate Action Plan and reflects the Center’s longtime investment in clean transportation.

Gasoline and diesel transportation currently accounts for 39% of California’s greenhouse gas emissions. Zero-emission vehicles, including EVs, directly limit both greenhouse gases and air pollution. Additionally, EV charging stations can support clean power generation. By charging their vehicles during the day, drivers can offset the solar energy “duck curve”—thus reducing the need for nighttime energy storage and allowing utility operators to incorporate more solar generation on the grid.

A red Tesla charges at the Schatz EV station

To charge at Schatz:

  • The Schatz Energy Research Center is located on the south side of campus, across from the Behavioral & Social Sciences building. To access the charging station, take the driveway between the G14 and G15 lots (see map) and park on the south side of the Schatz Center.
  • The Schatz station can provide charging for either of two adjacent parking spaces. One parking space is EV-only; parking here is limited to four hours, and the vehicle must be charging while parked. The second space is ADA parking (EV not required). HSU parking permits are required for both spaces and can be purchased from the kiosk in the G15 lot.
  • This first charging station was installed with funding support from HSU’s Office of Research, Economic & Community Development and will serve as a pilot for the campus. Initial station rules are based on policies from California State Universities with similar parking needs and constraints. After Parking and Commuter Services has data on HSU usage patterns, a formal EV charging station policy will be created. Additional stations will be installed as parking lots undergo routine renovation.