Dedication of the Schatz Center West Wing

On Friday, May 4, we formally dedicated our new West Wing addition. Congressional Representative Jared Huffman was joined by HSU President Lisa Rossbacher, Blue Lake Rancheria Tribal Council Member Jason Ramos, and Schatz Advisory Board members Jack West and Andrea Tuttle to celebrate the Center’s expansion.

The 1900 square foot addition is located immediately west of the main building, and includes two faculty offices, a conference room, and fourteen staff and student workstations. This increase in space has enabled us to hire nine additional student research assistants for summer 2018 to work on projects in wind energy, smart grids, biomass assessment, and off-grid energy access.

Student researchers outside the West Wing addition

Summer 2018 Schatz student research assistants (l to r):
Cassidy Barrientos, Tanya Garcia, Ellen Thompson, Sabrinna Rios Romero, Karsten Hayes, Anh Bui, Chih-Wei Hsu, Craig Mitchell, and Rene DeWees

The dedication ceremony was followed by an open house with demonstrations in solar product testing, biomass energy, and microgrid management systems, an unveiling of interpretive photo galleries newly installed throughout both buildings, and the official deployment of the first electric vehicle charging station on the HSU campus.

The West Wing addition was designed by Suarez Kuehne Architecture of San Francisco and built by a team led by Adams Commercial General Contracting of Eureka. Humboldt State University Facilities Management coordinated the design and construction process. The project was fully funded by donor contributions, including major support from the estate of Louis W. Schatz, additional gifts from Anne and David Katz, Peter and Carolyn Lehman, Christina and Jack West, Jamie Everett, and Joel Lehman, and grant funding from the California Energy Commission.

Jared Huffman speaks from a podium, between a zero-emission vehicle and the West Wing

Congressional Representative Jared Huffman speaks at the West Wing dedication

Lisa Rossbacher and Peter Lehman listen to fellow speakers at the West Wing dedication

HSU President Lisa Rossbacher and Schatz Founding Director Peter Lehman

Andrea Tuttle and Jack West (applauding)

Schatz Advisory Board member Andrea Tuttle (left) is recognized for sponsoring the Donald and Andrea Tuttle Fellowship for Clean Energy Studies (with Advisory Board member Jack West, right)

Arne Jacobson and Matthew Marshall outside the Schatz Center

Schatz Director Arne Jacobson and RCEA Executive Director Matthew Marshall celebrate the dedication

Position Opening: Student Administrative Assistant

The Schatz Energy Research Center has an immediate opening for a Student Administrative Assistant. Hourly wage is $11.28-$13.06; appointments are normally made at the beginning of the salary range. This is a part time (10-20 hours per week), hourly, non-benefited, non-State position at the Schatz Energy Research Center on the Humboldt State University campus. A one-year commitment is requested, with reappointment dependent on funding and performance.

Under the lead supervision of the Operations Manager and the day-to-day oversight of the Administrative Assistant, the Student Administrative Assistant will provide clerical and front office support while actively contributing to a positive and collaborative working environment.

Duties and Responsibilities: This position is responsible for the performance of varied administrative support duties including, but not limited to: screening and routing telephone calls and visitors; distributing mail and arranging return shipping; processing, compiling, and filing department documents; supply ordering and tracking; and securing/coordinating meeting and travel arrangements for Center personnel. In addition, this position performs basic bookkeeping support and record keeping and other tasks to be defined.

This position is open until filled. First consideration will be given to applications received by Friday, April 20 at 4 pm.

Read the full position details…

Job opening: Student Research Assistants for Summer 2018

The Schatz Energy Research Center has openings for up to six Student Research Assistants (SRAs) to work on a range of projects in Summer 2018. These three-month positions are expected to start on or near May 14, 2018.

The wage is $11.28 to $17.78 per hour, commensurate with skills and experience. The time base for the positions may vary from 20-40 hours per week, depending on project needs and funding availability. In some cases, it may be possible to begin work early (during the spring semester) at a rate of 5-10 hours per week. This is a temporary, non-benefited, hourly position.

View the complete position details.

All application material must be received by 4 pm on Wednesday, March 21, 2018.

SFSS lecture this Thursday (2/22): Do wind turbines make good neighbors?

In this week’s Sustainable Futures Speaker Series, energy researcher Joseph Rand shares results from a nationwide survey of people who live in proximity to wind farms. Wind power now supplies over 6% of the nation’s electricity demand, with over 60,000 turbines installed across the country. Which factors create community opposition or support for wind farm development?

Joseph Rand is a research affiliate in the Electricity Markets & Policy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and holds a MS in Energy and Resources from UC Berkeley and a BA in Environmental Studies from Macalester College. He conducts research and analysis on renewable energy, including cost and market analysis, spatial data analysis, and research related to public acceptance and deployment barriers of renewable energy.

Joseph Rand, headshot

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at Humboldt State creates interdisciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. Lectures are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7 pm in HSU Founders Hall 118. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, visit our series events page or call (707) 826-4345.

Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Spring 2018

This spring’s Sustainable Futures Speaker Series features nine talks on topics ranging from wind turbines to Icelandic glaciers, microgrids to traditional forestry practices, cannabis policy to tanoak restoration, the legal personhood of rivers to climate change in redwood ecologies, and the implications of clean energy access for human health. Events are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7:00 pm in Founders Hall 118 on the Humboldt State University campus.

This interdisciplinary speaker series is intended to stimulate cross disciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. The series is sponsored by the Schatz Center, the Environment & Community Graduate Program, and the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Humboldt State.

For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, please email or call the Schatz Center at (707) 826-4345.

Spring 2018 Season Poster

Announcing the Donald and Andrea Tuttle Fellowship for Clean Energy Studies

The Schatz Energy Research Center is pleased to announce the Donald and Andrea Tuttle Fellowship for Clean Energy Studies at Humboldt State University. The Tuttles have established this annual fellowship as part of an effort to tackle the challenges posed by climate change, and to reduce its impacts on humanity and ecosystems. The fellowship will support graduate students in Environmental Systems who intend to research or conduct project work in renewable energy, energy efficiency, or related areas in the clean energy field.

The Tuttle Fellowship will provide $15,000 in financial support for one academic year. The recipient is also eligible to be employed on research projects at the Schatz Center (typically, quarter-time throughout the academic year). The fellowship may be renewed once, based on performance and at the discretion of Schatz Center directors and the selection committee, for a second year of study.

The Tuttle joins two fellowships already associated with the Schatz Center: the Blue Lake Rancheria Fellowship for Clean Energy Studies and the Schatz Energy Fellowship. Current year fellows are working with Center projects in off-grid energy access and smart grid technologies. Jimento Aikhuele and Anamika Singh are involved with the Center’s quality assurance project on solar system installations at public facilities in Nigeria and Niger; Aikhuele’s associated thesis is on the use of renewable energy technologies to prevent maternal and infant fatality. Steven Shoemaker is conducting a benefits analysis of the recently deployed Blue Lake Rancheria microgrid, which was recognized this fall by the US Federal Emergency Management Agency for energy resiliency, while Thalia Quinn is working on the Center’s new “Solar+” distributed generation project.

Anamika and Thalia outside

2017/18 Schatz fellows Anamika Singh and Thalia Quinn (l to r) outside the Schatz Center’s West Wing

Hailing from around the globe, Schatz fellows cite the Center’s unique blend of technology and policy, and bring with them a commitment to social justice and environmental health. Before coming to the Schatz Center, Singh worked for the Bureau of Energy Efficiency, Ministry of Power, in India. “I want to contribute to providing energy access to those 1.2 billion people who are living a life without energy, through renewable energy technology… until you can provide them with basic facilities, development will not come.”

All graduate student applicants in the Environmental Resources Engineering (ERE) and Energy Technology and Policy (ETaP) pathways of the Environmental Systems program are eligible for fellowship consideration. February 1 is the annual application deadline for admission into the graduate program at Humboldt State. For more information, visit schatzcenter.org/fellowships, email serc@humboldt.edu, or call (707) 826-4345.

A Quality Assurance Framework for Solar System Installations at Public Facilities in West Africa

Community members around a water pump


Zhigbodo Community Borehole, Niger

The Schatz Center and the ECOWAS Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE), with support from the World Bank through their Lighting Africa program, are working collaboratively with government partners in Nigeria and Niger to develop a new approach for the procurement, installation, and long-term maintenance of off-grid solar electricity systems at public facilities, such as health clinics, schools, police posts, public offices, and water pumps.

Off-grid solar systems offer the promise of clean, renewable electricity for public facilities. However, historically, there has been a high failure rate for these systems in many countries, often caused by poor quality design and installation, or lack of maintenance and good operational practices following installation even when initially high quality system components are installed.

Students are gathered inside a primary classroom


Primary school classroom in Gwarinpa, Nigeria

The proposed new approach involves the innovative use of digital remote monitoring technology, along with quality standards for equipment, design, and installation, to ensure and verify the ongoing performance of off-grid solar electricity systems. Under such an approach, companies in the off-grid solar sector could enter lease agreements or extended service contracts with government agencies to provide an agreed-upon level of electricity service in return for guaranteed monthly payments. The payments could be designed to cover the capital costs of equipment and installation (or a percentage of these costs), along with the ongoing operation and maintenance costs over the projected system life. By digitally monitoring the performance of the systems, a third-party could verify that the service provider is delivering the agreed electrical service and instruct the government agency to pay the monthly fee. Spreading the cost of the systems over many years and keeping service providers engaged is expected to improve the long-term performance of the systems.

Over the next two years, the proposed approach will be developed, evaluated, and revised through research and deployment of approximately fifteen pilot systems in Nigeria and fifteen pilot systems in Niger. Our main role in this effort is to develop the quality assurance framework that serves as the basis for the approach. This includes determining a standard for service delivery that can be used to verify that the system’s performance matches contractually specified targets. Our staff will conduct site visits, provide technical designs for the thirty pilot systems, and verify system performance for the first six months. Support for this effort is provided by the World Bank Group’s Lighting Africa Program.

Jimento Aikhuele takes solar measurements in a schoolyard


Jimento Aikhuele takes solar measurements in a schoolyard

A car is parked under a solar array


Working solar installation in Nasarawa, Nigeria

To kickoff the project this September, three team members visited sites in Niger and Nigeria to gather initial information about health clinics, schools and other public facilities. Chris Carlsen, a Center alumna and current consultant, met with officials in Niger and visited several communities to understand the country’s existing infrastructure. Jimento Aikhuele, a Schatz Energy graduate fellow originally from Nigeria, and Olakunle Owoeye, a Center consultant, met Chris in Nigeria to scope out potential sites for pilot installations and learn about the energy needs of the various facilities. The team also visited sites with existing solar installations to gain insight into why well-intentioned solar systems so often fail. Our initial work in the field was fruitful thanks to the indispensable support of ECREEE, the Ministries of Energy, Health and Secondary Education of Niger, and the Ministry of Power, Works and Housing of Nigeria.

Back at the Schatz Center, we have been hard at work reviewing existing standards and determining appropriate requirements to include in the quality assurance framework. This work dovetails with projects we’ve conducted in the past, including the ongoing development and co-management of the Lighting Global Quality Assurance program. We are looking forward to heading back into the field to gather more information before finalizing a draft of the framework and providing recommended designs for the pilot installations next spring.

PV module performance over time: assessing 26 years at the HSU Telonicher Marine Lab

In 1990, the Schatz Center installed 192 ARCO M75 photovoltaic (PV) modules at the HSU Telonicher Marine Lab in Trinidad, California, 150 m off the Pacific Ocean. Current voltage (IV) tests were performed on each module prior to the array’s construction in 1990, again in 2001 and 2010, and most recently in 2016 after the array was decommissioned.

Read our report, which will appear in the June 2017 Proceedings of the 44th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference…