Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Scaling up renewable power in Humboldt County – Nov 9

Join us on Thursday, November 9 at 5:30 pm in Founders Hall 118 for the final session in this semester’s Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. A panel of energy experts will explore the opportunities and challenges of scaling up renewable power in Humboldt County, through questions such as:

  • If we want to support expanded use of renewable energy, should we prioritize purchasing low cost renewable power from outside the area or generating renewable power locally?
  • How might our relative isolation impact the sale of locally generated renewable energy to the Western grid?
  • How do we balance our critical need for rural resilience with investment in renewable sources such as wind and solar?
  • To what extent is our local grid infrastructure ready to support distributed generation?

Moderator Arne Jacobson (Director, Schatz Energy Research Center) will be joined by Matthew Marshall (Executive Director, Redwood Coast Energy Authority), Antoine Peiffer (Lead Engineer, Principle Power), Jon Stallman (Integrated Grid Planner, Pacific Gas & Electric) and Dave Carter (Managing Research Engineer, Schatz Center) for this forward-looking discussion about clean energy strategies for the north coast.

This speaker series is intended to stimulate cross-disciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. The series is sponsored by the Schatz Center, the Environment & Community Graduate Program, and the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences at Humboldt State University. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, email serc@humboldt.edu or call (707) 826-4345.

Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Mara Ervin on October 26

Headshot of Mara Ervin

Join us on Thursday, October 26 at 5:30 pm in Founders Hall 118, for a presentation by Mara Ervin on “Clean energy access: how GRID Alternatives is creating a successful transition to clean, renewable energy that includes everyone.”

Mara Ervin is the Bay Area Development & Programs Manager for GRID Alternatives. Headquartered in Oakland, GRID Alternatives is the nation’s largest nonprofit solar installer. GRID has been recognized as a 2014 White House Champion of Change, a 2017 IREC Energy Hero, and an EPA Climate Change Champion.

Ervin is a graduate of Smith College and has eight years of experience in social equity non-profit development and leadership, including five with GRID’s Bay Area office.

Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Amy & Daniel Cordalis on October 5

Join us on Thursday, October 5 at 5:30 pm in Founders Hall 118, for a presentation by Amy & Daniel Cordalis on “Breathing life back into the Klamath River.”

Amy & Daniel Cordalis stand against a brick wall, holding hands

Amy & Daniel Cordalis

Amy Cordalis is General Counsel for the Yurok Tribe. She comes from a long line of Yurok Indians from the village of Requa at the mouth of the Klamath River, who have fought for Yurok rights: her great-uncle’s Supreme Court case, Mattz v. Arnett, confirmed the Yurok Reservation as Indian Country and set the stage for the Tribe’s federally reserved fishing and water rights. Cordalis received her undergraduate from the University of Oregon and her JD from the University of Denver College of Law. Before returning home to work for the Yurok Tribe in 2014, Cordalis worked for the Native American Rights Fund and Berkey Williams LLP on a wide range of Indian law issues.

Daniel Cordalis is a member of the Navajo Nation and a practicing attorney in natural resources and Indian law. Cordalis clerked for the Colorado Supreme Court and the Native American Rights Fund, and worked for the National Congress of American Indians in Washington D.C. and as an associate attorney for the Denver Earthjustice office. He received an undergraduate in geology from Rice University, a master’s in geography from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and his JD from the University of Colorado.

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series is cosponsored by the Schatz Energy Research Center, the Environment & Community graduate program, and the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Humboldt State. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, email us at serc@humboldt.edu or call (707) 826-4345.

Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Nick Goulette on September 28

Join us on Thursday, September 28 at 5:30 pm in Founders Hall 118, for a presentation by Nick Goulette on imagining and achieving the potential of community-based forestry in Northern California. As The Watershed Center’s executive director, Nick Goulette oversees programs focused on forestry, fire and fuels, watershed and fisheries, youth engagement, enterprise development, policy, and research.

Over the past thirteen years with the Watershed Center, Goulette has worked on a wide range of collaborative projects. He is the Chair of the Northern CA Prescribed Fire Council and a long-time member of the leadership team for the Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition. He also helped establish the CA Forest Biomass Working Group and the CA Statewide Wood Energy Team, and worked with the design and launch of the national Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network.

Goulette was born and raised in Maine and received a B.S. in Forestry from the University of Vermont with a concentration in Community-Based Forestry. He now lives with his wife Naomi on a homestead in Weaverville, California.

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series is cosponsored by the Schatz Energy Research Center, the Environment & Community graduate program, and the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Humboldt State. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, email us at serc@humboldt.edu or call (707) 826-4345.

Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Debbie Page-Dumroese on August 31

Join us on Thursday, August 31 at 5:30 pm in Founders Hall 118, for a presentation by visiting soil scientist Debbie Page-Dumroese on the use of biochar to sequester carbon and improve soil resilience. Biochar is a porous, high-carbon material derived from exposing biomass to temperatures above 500°C in a low-oxygen environment. The resultant “char” is typically used as a soil amendment to increase water-holding capacity and nutrient retention.

Page-Dumroese has been a Research Soil Scientist with the USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station for over three decades. Her work focuses on long-term soil productivity after harvest operation, sustainable harvesting, wood decomposition, and biochar. For the last ten years, she has been investigating the potential to reduce slash pile burns and limit wildfire risks by using onsite biochar conversion technologies.

Visiting Speaker Debbie Page-Dumroese

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series is cosponsored by the Schatz Energy Research Center and HSU’s Environment & Community graduate program. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, email us at serc@humboldt.edu or call (707) 826-4345.