Schatz Energy Spring/Summer Newsletter

Our print (and pdf) newsletter is just off the press, with features & updates on:

  • the Redwood Coast Airport (ACV) microgrid
  • breaking ground on Solar+ at the Blue Lake Rancheria
  • the California Biopower Impact project
  • our recent publications on biomass conversion technologies
  • the May dedication of the West Wing addition, and
  • HSU’s first EV charging station, unveiled at the Schatz Center…

… Plus a recap of our spring education and outreach programs, faculty and fellowship news, and recent conference presentations.

Two middle school students hold solar modules and fans in the sun


Students explore solar circuits at the 2018 Redwood Environmental Education Fair

Schatz Energy interviews on KHSU

Catch up with these recent Schatz Energy interviews on the KHSU Magazine:

Measuring Dirty Fuels to Improve Lives
Show host David Reed with Schatz Center’s Nick Lam • April 13, 2018

Resilience Achieved with Blue Lake Rancheria Microgrid
Show host Katie Whiteside with Schatz Center’s Peter Lehman and Jana Ganion of the Blue Lake Rancheria • April 5, 2018

Do Wind Turbines Make Good Neighbors?
Show host Katie Whiteside with visiting SFSS lecturer Joseph Rand • February 22, 2018

Lectures from the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series are also posted to Humboldt Digital Scholar once available.

April 12 Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Energy access, health & the environment

Headshot of Nicholas Lam

    Nicholas Lam

Millions of families worldwide rely on solid and polluting fuels to meet their basic energy needs, such as cooking, heating, and lighting. This talk will discuss how sociological and physical measurement methods are being used to characterize energy needs, estimate the impacts of energy poverty, and identify mitigation opportunities.

Nicholas Lam is a Research Scientist at the Schatz Energy Research Center. His research interests are directed towards improving the welfare and environment of families living in low- and middle- income countries through improvements to the household energy system. Lam has a Ph.D. in Environmental Health Sciences and a M.S. in Global Health and Development from the University of California, Berkeley.

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at Humboldt State creates interdisciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. Lectures are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7 pm in HSU Founders Hall 118. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, visit our series events page or call (707) 826-4345.

Energy Adoption Patterns in Uganda: Final Blog

In 2017, we worked with UNCDF’s CleanStart Programme in partnership with SolarAid/Acumen, to evaluate the impact of pay-as-you-go purchase opportunities for small solar systems in Uganda.

Here’s the third and final installment of our blog series, with some initial findings:

Read our previous blogs:

2018 Global Off-Grid Solar Forum and Expo

Kristen Radecsky in discussion at the Expo

Schatz Center Senior Research Engineer Kristen Radecsky discusses technical points with a solar product designer.

The test lab network team

Participants in the Lighting Global Test Laboratory Network following a successful meeting held at the Forum and Expo. Schatz Center team members Kristen Radecsky and Scott Toyama organized the meeting and led the discussions.

The Schatz Energy Research Center was a major presence at the 5th Global Off-Grid Solar Forum and Expo, which took place this week in Hong Kong. The conference is the premier global event for the off-grid solar industry. Schatz Center Director Arne Jacobson was on the conference organizing committee, and six members of the Center’s off-grid team delivered presentations and facilitated discussions in conference sessions and side events over the three-day meeting.

The Schatz Center’s involvement in the conference is linked to its leadership role in the World Bank Group’s Lighting Global Quality Assurance Program, the world’s leading framework for quality assurance and consumer protection for off-grid solar products. The quality assurance program is widely used to support consumer protection for low-income families in off-grid areas of Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands.

The Center’s work on Lighting Global is carried out in partnership with CLASP, a D.C.-based non-profit, and it involves close collaboration with the Global Off-Grid Lighting Association (GOGLA).

A Quality Assurance Framework for Solar System Installations at Public Facilities in West Africa

Community members around a water pump


Zhigbodo Community Borehole, Niger

The Schatz Center and the ECOWAS Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE), with support from the World Bank through their Lighting Africa program, are working collaboratively with government partners in Nigeria and Niger to develop a new approach for the procurement, installation, and long-term maintenance of off-grid solar electricity systems at public facilities, such as health clinics, schools, police posts, public offices, and water pumps.

Off-grid solar systems offer the promise of clean, renewable electricity for public facilities. However, historically, there has been a high failure rate for these systems in many countries, often caused by poor quality design and installation, or lack of maintenance and good operational practices following installation even when initially high quality system components are installed.

Students are gathered inside a primary classroom


Primary school classroom in Gwarinpa, Nigeria

The proposed new approach involves the innovative use of digital remote monitoring technology, along with quality standards for equipment, design, and installation, to ensure and verify the ongoing performance of off-grid solar electricity systems. Under such an approach, companies in the off-grid solar sector could enter lease agreements or extended service contracts with government agencies to provide an agreed-upon level of electricity service in return for guaranteed monthly payments. The payments could be designed to cover the capital costs of equipment and installation (or a percentage of these costs), along with the ongoing operation and maintenance costs over the projected system life. By digitally monitoring the performance of the systems, a third-party could verify that the service provider is delivering the agreed electrical service and instruct the government agency to pay the monthly fee. Spreading the cost of the systems over many years and keeping service providers engaged is expected to improve the long-term performance of the systems.

Over the next two years, the proposed approach will be developed, evaluated, and revised through research and deployment of approximately fifteen pilot systems in Nigeria and fifteen pilot systems in Niger. Our main role in this effort is to develop the quality assurance framework that serves as the basis for the approach. This includes determining a standard for service delivery that can be used to verify that the system’s performance matches contractually specified targets. Our staff will conduct site visits, provide technical designs for the thirty pilot systems, and verify system performance for the first six months. Support for this effort is provided by the World Bank Group’s Lighting Africa Program.

Jimento Aikhuele takes solar measurements in a schoolyard


Jimento Aikhuele takes solar measurements in a schoolyard

A car is parked under a solar array


Working solar installation in Nasarawa, Nigeria

To kickoff the project this September, three team members visited sites in Niger and Nigeria to gather initial information about health clinics, schools and other public facilities. Chris Carlsen, a Center alumna and current consultant, met with officials in Niger and visited several communities to understand the country’s existing infrastructure. Jimento Aikhuele, a Schatz Energy graduate fellow originally from Nigeria, and Olakunle Owoeye, a Center consultant, met Chris in Nigeria to scope out potential sites for pilot installations and learn about the energy needs of the various facilities. The team also visited sites with existing solar installations to gain insight into why well-intentioned solar systems so often fail. Our initial work in the field was fruitful thanks to the indispensable support of ECREEE, the Ministries of Energy, Health and Secondary Education of Niger, and the Ministry of Power, Works and Housing of Nigeria.

Back at the Schatz Center, we have been hard at work reviewing existing standards and determining appropriate requirements to include in the quality assurance framework. This work dovetails with projects we’ve conducted in the past, including the ongoing development and co-management of the Lighting Global Quality Assurance program. We are looking forward to heading back into the field to gather more information before finalizing a draft of the framework and providing recommended designs for the pilot installations next spring.

Energy Adoption Patterns in Uganda

The United Nations Capital Development Fund’s CleanStart Programme, in partnership with SolarAid/Acumen and the Schatz Center, is conducting research on energy adoption patterns. This project seeks to determine which channels customers in rural Uganda use to finance and purchase solar systems. We are also investigating the drivers of solar product adoption, including the influence of flexible financing tools on purchasing behavior.

We have learned that the quality of existing energy services plays an important role in shaping customers’ receptiveness to alternative off-grid solutions. Our research also shows that in-person marketing, “real-life” observations, interactions with sales staff, recommendations by thought leaders, and conversations with existing satisfied customers are all strongly influential in driving end-user uptake of solar energy products.