Schatz Education Program: Volunteer Opportunity

The Schatz Center’s education team brings energy-based environmental programs to the local community. Education volunteers are key members of our outreach—leading many of our presentations for K12 classrooms, afterschool and summer programs, campus fairs, and community events.

A docent and three robotics campers explore solar circuits

Education volunteers:

  • Enjoy working with diverse age groups
  • Are comfortable with public speaking
  • Have a background or strong interest in science or education
  • Are able to volunteer 1-5 hours per week

Students in all majors are invited to apply.

Application Procedure:

Submit a letter of application, a one-page resume, and an unofficial transcript of academic coursework to Schatz Energy Research Center, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521 or via email to serc@humboldt.edu.

All applications must be received by 5 pm Friday, August 31, 2018.

Schatz Energy Spring/Summer Newsletter

Our print (and pdf) newsletter is just off the press, with features & updates on:

  • the Redwood Coast Airport (ACV) microgrid
  • breaking ground on Solar+ at the Blue Lake Rancheria
  • the California Biopower Impact project
  • our recent publications on biomass conversion technologies
  • the May dedication of the West Wing addition, and
  • HSU’s first EV charging station, unveiled at the Schatz Center…

… Plus a recap of our spring education and outreach programs, faculty and fellowship news, and recent conference presentations.

Two middle school students hold solar modules and fans in the sun


Students explore solar circuits at the 2018 Redwood Environmental Education Fair

Director’s Note: June 2018

On May 4, we had the pleasure of hosting the Schatz Center Advisory Board for our annual meeting. In addition to our customary discussion of Center activities and strategy, we were happy to be able to include the Advisory Board members in a dedication ceremony for our new building addition, which we have been calling the ‘West Wing.’

Advisory Board standing outside the West Wing

Schatz Advisory Board members (left to right): Andrea Tuttle, Rick Duke, Jeff Serfass, Jack West, Christina Manansala West, David Rubin, David Katz, and Denise Helwig, and Directors Charles Chamberlin, Peter Lehman and Arne Jacobson. Not pictured: Dan Kammen and Jaimie Levin.

During the meeting, we reported our progress toward the Center’s strategic goals—which are derived from our mission to promote clean and renewable energy—and discussed our portfolio of projects, budget, staffing, and space within this context. We were able to report good news to the Advisory Board in multiple spheres.

We noted that our two most active project areas are those related to (i) renewable energy microgrids, grid integration of renewable energy, and associated demand-side management strategies and (ii) improved access to energy in off-grid and marginal grid communities in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Together with our partners, we have received recognition for our efforts in both areas: in January alone, the Blue Lake Rancheria renewable energy microgrid was awarded the Project of the Year for Distributed Energy Resources at the annual DistribuTECH conference in San Antonio, Texas, while our energy access team simultaneously played a key role at the premier international conference for the off-grid solar sector, the Global Off-Grid Solar Forum and Expo in Hong Kong. We also have current projects and activities in bioenergy, clean transportation, off-shore wind, energy efficiency, hydrogen energy, clean energy policy, and education/outreach. Our staff expertise continues to deepen, and we have ample opportunities for continued work in pursuit of our mission.

Regarding staffing, we have a motivated, skilled, and professional team, and their strengths provide the foundation for our success. Recent additions to the Schatz Center include Dr. Nicholas Lam (research scientist), Kaileigh Vincent-Welling (engineering technician), Richard Williams (engineering technician), and Jessica Ramirez (administrative assistant). We are pleased to welcome them to our team. During the advisory board meeting, we discussed two strategic foci in relation to personnel. We began by noting the importance of expanding our team’s project management capacity to meet the needs of our growing work portfolio. We then discussed our commitment to increasing staff diversity and ensuring a broadly welcoming work environment. We appreciate our board’s thoughtful advice, and we look forward to a continued focus on these key issues.

And, of course, we celebrated our new building and the opportunities that it enables. Importantly, the increase in space—along with a commitment to student mentorship by faculty and staff on our team—has allowed us to hire nine summer student interns. They join seven continuing student employees, for a total of 16 students working with us this summer. This is the largest number of students working at Schatz Center at one time in the history of our organization. We are grateful for the contributions that each student is making to our work, and I thank my colleagues for all that they have done to create hands-on learning opportunities.

Happy summer solstice, and goodbye until next time. ~ Arne Jacobson

Dedication of the Schatz Center West Wing

On Friday, May 4, we formally dedicated our new West Wing addition. Congressional Representative Jared Huffman was joined by HSU President Lisa Rossbacher, Blue Lake Rancheria Tribal Council Member Jason Ramos, and Schatz Advisory Board members Jack West and Andrea Tuttle to celebrate the Center’s expansion.

The 1900 square foot addition is located immediately west of the main building, and includes two faculty offices, a conference room, and fourteen staff and student workstations. This increase in space has enabled us to hire nine additional student research assistants for summer 2018 to work on projects in wind energy, smart grids, biomass assessment, and off-grid energy access.

Student researchers outside the West Wing addition

Summer 2018 Schatz student research assistants (l to r):
Cassidy Barrientos, Tanya Garcia, Ellen Thompson, Sabrinna Rios Romero, Karsten Hayes, Anh Bui, Chih-Wei Hsu, Craig Mitchell, and Rene DeWees

The dedication ceremony was followed by an open house with demonstrations in solar product testing, biomass energy, and microgrid management systems, an unveiling of interpretive photo galleries newly installed throughout both buildings, and the official deployment of the first electric vehicle charging station on the HSU campus.

The West Wing addition was designed by Suarez Kuehne Architecture of San Francisco and built by a team led by Adams Commercial General Contracting of Eureka. Humboldt State University Facilities Management coordinated the design and construction process. The project was fully funded by donor contributions, including major support from the estate of Louis W. Schatz, additional gifts from Anne and David Katz, Peter and Carolyn Lehman, Christina and Jack West, Jamie Everett, and Joel Lehman, and grant funding from the California Energy Commission.

Jared Huffman speaks from a podium, between a zero-emission vehicle and the West Wing

Congressional Representative Jared Huffman speaks at the West Wing dedication

Lisa Rossbacher and Peter Lehman listen to fellow speakers at the West Wing dedication

HSU President Lisa Rossbacher and Schatz Founding Director Peter Lehman

Andrea Tuttle and Jack West (applauding)

Schatz Advisory Board member Andrea Tuttle (left) is recognized for sponsoring the Donald and Andrea Tuttle Fellowship for Clean Energy Studies (with Advisory Board member Jack West, right)

Arne Jacobson and Matthew Marshall outside the Schatz Center

Schatz Director Arne Jacobson and RCEA Executive Director Matthew Marshall celebrate the dedication

EV charging station unveiled at the Schatz Center

Humboldt State University recently unveiled its first electric vehicle (EV) charging station, located next to the Schatz Center’s “West Wing” addition. “We are proud to introduce electric vehicle charging to the HSU campus and advance our goals of greenhouse gas reduction and sustainability,” says Dr. Peter Lehman, the Center’s founding director. The new charging station supports goals articulated in HSU’s Climate Action Plan and reflects the Center’s longtime investment in clean transportation.

Gasoline and diesel transportation currently accounts for 39% of California’s greenhouse gas emissions. Zero-emission vehicles, including EVs, directly limit both greenhouse gases and air pollution. Additionally, EV charging stations can support clean power generation. By charging their vehicles during the day, drivers can offset the solar energy “duck curve”—thus reducing the need for nighttime energy storage and allowing utility operators to incorporate more solar generation on the grid.

A red Tesla charges at the Schatz EV station

To charge at Schatz:

  • The Schatz Energy Research Center is located on the south side of campus, across from the Behavioral & Social Sciences building. To access the charging station, take the driveway between the G14 and G15 lots (see map) and park on the south side of the Schatz Center.
  • The Schatz station can provide charging for either of two adjacent parking spaces. One parking space is EV-only; parking here is limited to four hours, and the vehicle must be charging while parked. The second space is ADA parking (EV not required). HSU parking permits are required for both spaces and can be purchased from the kiosk in the G15 lot.
  • This first charging station was installed with funding support from HSU’s Office of Research, Economic & Community Development and will serve as a pilot for the campus. Initial station rules are based on policies from California State Universities with similar parking needs and constraints. After Parking and Commuter Services has data on HSU usage patterns, a formal EV charging station policy will be created. Additional stations will be installed as parking lots undergo routine renovation.

April 12 Sustainable Futures Speaker Series: Energy access, health & the environment

Headshot of Nicholas Lam

    Nicholas Lam

Millions of families worldwide rely on solid and polluting fuels to meet their basic energy needs, such as cooking, heating, and lighting. This talk will discuss how sociological and physical measurement methods are being used to characterize energy needs, estimate the impacts of energy poverty, and identify mitigation opportunities.

Nicholas Lam is a Research Scientist at the Schatz Energy Research Center. His research interests are directed towards improving the welfare and environment of families living in low- and middle- income countries through improvements to the household energy system. Lam has a Ph.D. in Environmental Health Sciences and a M.S. in Global Health and Development from the University of California, Berkeley.

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at Humboldt State creates interdisciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. Lectures are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7 pm in HSU Founders Hall 118. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, visit our series events page or call (707) 826-4345.

Sustainable Futures 4/5: Greening the Grid & Improving Resilience

Jana Ganion and Peter Lehman

Renewable energy microgrids are an emerging technology that can support:

  • emergency preparedness
  • job creation
  • greenhouse gas reductions
  • energy cost savings
  • grid reliability
  • and improved resilience across lifeline sectors.

In this week’s Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presentation, Jana Ganion, Sustainability Director for the Blue Lake Rancheria (BLR), will join Peter Lehman, Founding Director of the Schatz Center, to discuss project challenges, first year performance, and the economic and environmental benefits of the ground-breaking BLR microgrid. They will also discuss other related activities in the region, including the upcoming renewable energy microgrid project at the Arcata-Eureka (ACV) airport.

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at Humboldt State creates interdisciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. Lectures are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7 pm in HSU Founders Hall 118. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, visit our series events page or call (707) 826-4345.

Request for quotes: website development (revised)

Note: this is a revised RFQ.

The Schatz Center website is undergoing revision. We are currently seeking a developer who
will implement our site architecture and design.

Coding choice is flexible, provided that:

  • Both design and content modifications are easily accessible by Schatz staff.
  • The coding environment maximizes clarity and simplicity.
  • The site is responsive to desktop, tablet, and mobile environments.

We will provide overall site design, design/layout for key pages, and all content, including
photos and text.

Download the project outline and submission details here.

Applications and associated inquiries should be emailed to Maia Cheli at serc@humboldt.edu.

  • First review will be April 9, 2018.
  • Anticipated project start date will be April 23.
  • All pages should be fully developed and ready for content (following draft and revision
    process) by May 15.
  • We have an anticipated full website launch date of June 8.

Sustainable Futures 3/22: Restoring Redwood Forests in a Changing Climate

Emily Burns standing next to a redwood

With rapid climate change, the importance of coast redwood forests is increasing. Old-growth redwood forests on the northcoast store record-breaking amounts of carbon, and the trees themselves are growing faster today than in previous decades. Research shows that restoration techniques are effective at accelerating the growth of harvested forests and increasing their carbon sequestration potential.

Emily Burns is the Director of Science for Save the Redwoods League, and directs the research program that includes the Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative and the Redwood Genome Project. She holds a PhD in Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley for her studies on the impacts of fog on coast redwood forest flora, and a BS in Plant Biology from UC Davis. She is a Research Associate in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at UC Santa Cruz, and was the recipient of the 2013 Women in Science Frameshifter Award from St. Catherine University. Burns contributes frequently to the League’s blog, and in her scant spare time, she enjoys embroidering, particularly designs of native plants of redwood forests.

The Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at Humboldt State creates interdisciplinary discussion, debate, and collaboration around issues related to energy, the environment, and society. Lectures are held on Thursdays from 5:30-7 pm in HSU Founders Hall 118. For details on upcoming events or to request accessibility accommodations, visit our series events page or call (707) 826-4345.

A clean energy microgrid for the Humboldt County airport

A cutting-edge clean energy microgrid is coming to Humboldt County’s regional airport. Designed by the Schatz Center, the microgrid will generate green electricity, create jobs for local contractors and technicians, and provide an energy lifeline in the event of a natural disaster. Last week, the California Energy Commission announced a $5 million grant award through its EPIC program that will support $6 million in matching funding from the Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA), for development of this solar + storage microgrid system.

“The Redwood Coast Energy Authority is excited to be partnering with the Schatz Center, PG&E, and the County,” said Matthew Marshall, Executive Director of the RCEA. “This project will allow us to provide enhanced resiliency and emergency-response capabilities for the airport and Coast Guard and deliver the environmental and economic benefits of developing our local renewable resources.”

Composed of a 2.3 megawatt photovoltaic array covering 9 acres—the largest in Humboldt County—and an 8 megawatt-hour battery storage system, equivalent to the batteries in 100 Tesla Model S cars, the microgrid will support 18 electric accounts including the airport and the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station.

The California Redwood Coast-Humboldt County Airport serves 50,000 flights a year and 140,000 customers, including commercial, private, and emergency medical flights. The Coast Guard Air Station Humboldt Bay provides search and rescue for 250 miles of rugged rural coastline, from the Mendocino-Sonoma County line to the California-Oregon border. Since roads into and out of Humboldt County are often closed by fires and slides, energy stability at the regional airport is crucial.

Aerial view of ACV airport from plane


Aerial view of ACV airport

“This is a wonderful project for Humboldt County and we have a great team eager to get started,” said Peter Lehman, founding director of the Schatz Center and principal investigator for the project. “The airport microgrid will make us a safer and more resilient community and plow new ground in developing the electric grid of the future.”

As the first multi-customer microgrid in Pacific Gas and Electric’s service territory, the project will provide a test bed for the policies, tariff structures, and operating procedures necessary to integrate microgrids into California’s electric grid. Lessons learned will help the state strengthen its power grid by creating a roadmap for microgrid integration across the state.

A microgrid combines energy generation–often solar or wind power–with energy storage and smart controls to allow it to run both connected to and disconnected from the larger power grid. Under normal conditions, microgrids add power to the grid and smooth out power fluctuations, adding stability. In an outage, microgrids can “island” and supply electricity indefinitely. As extreme weather events and fires driven by climate change continue to cause regional outages, the ability to maintain independent power generation is key to local resiliency. Microgrids provide life-saving power to transportation hubs and other critical facilities like shelters, hospitals, and fire stations.

The airport microgrid is the second designed by the Schatz Center for the Humboldt Bay region. The Center’s renewable energy microgrid at the Blue Lake Rancheria (BLR) went live in 2017, providing clean energy to the BLR campus and enabling the Rancheria to operate as a Red Cross Shelter. Last fall, the Rancheria was recognized by the Federal Emergency Management Agency for its contributions to community safety.